More of the Tex-Mex Series

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 7, "Alamo Plaza - The Cradle of Tex-Mex"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:  7 1/4 x 4 5/8 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Mexican Chili Stands" combined with photo of dried chiles.  Copy drawn from original descriptive copy:  "Dear Uncle Louis, For the sake of olden times, the Mexicans are still allowed to set up their tables and camp stoves on the Plazas and serve their native dishes, such as chili con carne and chili verde, in the open air.  We wish you would come visit.  Love, Virginia."

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 8, "Salsa and the City"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:   5 1/16 x 5 5/8 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Chili Stands" combined with photo of salsa.  Copy drawn from original descriptive copy of No. 7: "Dear Uncle Clyde, The exotic chili queens reign over Alamo plaza. As day dawns and the lamps show dimmer, these queer hotel keepers put out their fires and, folding their tables, 'silently steal away' until another night.  Their 'al fresco' offerings would make Alamo Plaza your favorite haunt. Love, Virginia."

 

 

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 9, "Los Hombres y Sus Sombreros"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:  9 1/2 x 5 1/4 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Mexican Lover" combined with late 1800s' Underwood stereoview of a Mexico City sombreria. Copy taken from back of stereoview card: In Mexico, only the men wear hats, and they are a very valued possession.  Sometimes a man will invest his entire fortune of thirty or forty dollars in his sombrero. They are frequently of vast dimensions."

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 10 "Tiene el Mas Grande"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:   8 1/4 x 6 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Mexican Street Peddlers" combined with late 1800s' Underwood stereoview of a Mexico City sombreria. Copy taken from back of stereoview card: "The larger the sombrero, the greater its aesthetic value is in the eye of the average Mexican. The flourish with which he doffs it in salute is something never to be forgotten by the unaccustomed foreigner."

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 11, "Luna de Miel"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:  7 3/8 x 5 1/2 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Mexican Lover" combined with "Greetings from the land of..." and photos of milk and honey, or miel. The title of this print means honeymoon.

 

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 13, "They Remember San Jacinto"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:   5 3/4 x 4 1/8 inches inches

Early 1900s' miniature souvenir folder with the Alamo on the cover and inside picture of "Typical Mexican Home and Family."  Copy drawn from actual printed copy inside folder: "Historically San Antonio boasts that 'Thermopylae had is messenger of defeat, but the Alamo had none.' Many notable and historic buildings and quaint customs of 'Long ago' mingle with the beautiful romantic aspects of the past."

 

chile queens on alamo plaza
chli stands on alamo plaza
stereoview of sombreria
luna de miel san antonio
remember san jacinto
sombreros in san antonio