Remember the Alamo

A few of Gayle's Alamo-related collages have been rounded up from different pages for the convenience of Alamobsessive types, of which she is one.

This page also includes two protest works, designed to be ugly by incorporating just a few of the signs indicating the over-commercialization of the state's premier historic district. As followers of Gayle's blog have noticed, the proliferating sign violations proliferate her posts. This link leads to the one about these two collages.

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 8, "Salsa and the City"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:   5 1/16 x 5 5/8 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Chili Stands" combined with photo of salsa.  Copy drawn from original descriptive copy of No. 7: "Dear Uncle Clyde, The exotic chili queens reign over Alamo plaza. As day dawns and the lamps show dimmer, these queer hotel keepers put out their fires and, folding their tables, 'silently steal away' until another night.  Their 'al fresco' offerings would make Alamo Plaza your favorite haunt. Love, Virginia."

 

 

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 7, "Alamo Plaza - The Cradle of Tex-Mex"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:  7 1/4 x 4 5/8 inches

Early 1900s' postcard labeled "Mexican Chili Stands" combined with photo of dried chiles.  Copy drawn from original descriptive copy:  "Dear Uncle Louis, For the sake of olden times, the Mexicans are still allowed to set up their tables and camp stoves on the Plazas and serve their native dishes, such as chili con carne and chili verde, in the open air.  We wish you would come visit.  Love, Virginia."

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 13, "They Remember San Jacinto"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:   5 3/4 x 4 1/8 inches inches

Early 1900s' miniature souvenir folder with the Alamo on the cover and inside picture of "Typical Mexican Home and Family."  Copy drawn from actual printed copy inside folder: "Historically San Antonio boasts that 'Thermopylae had is messenger of defeat, but the Alamo had none.' Many notable and historic buildings and quaint customs of 'Long ago' mingle with the beautiful romantic aspects of the past."

 

The Blue Book ~ No. 1, "See Sallie after the Alamo"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $70 each. Image size:  8 x 5 3/4 inches

The back cover of the 1911-1912 edition of "The Blue Book" reads "For Information of the Red Light District Ask Me. Meet me at the Beauty Saloon."  This image is combined with advertisements, including Sallie Brewer's, from an inside page of the guide to San Antonio's "Sporting District," a red light and an early 1900s' postcard of The Alamo.

 

1936 Texas Centennial ~ No. 5, "The Alamo Always Trumps"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $75 each. 8 1/2 x 11 inches

Official Centennial souvenirs included everything one would need for a themed ladies’ bridge party, such as this Centennial “Six Flags” plate. The well-worn playing cards are from an earlier deck of San Antonio landmark cards. While the gourmet sandwich roll recipe can be viewed, missing are the recipes for absolutely plain gelatin in star moulds and “cocktails” – equal part orange and grapefruit juices, dash of lemon juice, slice of orange, sprig of mint, a red cherry and a green cherry.

 

 

"Mission San Antonio de Valero Missing"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $75 each. 8 1/2 x 11 inches

St. Anthony, the patron saint of miracles and finding lost things. A preacher so effective fish in the river once raised their heads out of the water to hear his words. But can he find his mission now lost in the heart of the city named in his honor? There is certainly a lot more about this collage on Gayle's blog.

 

 

 

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 21, "We've Lost the Alamo"

Edition limited to 25 prints, $75 each. Image size: 10  x 7.75 inches

Yes, Numbers 21 and 22 are the ugliest collages ever to reflect the overwhelming commercialization of Alamo Plaza. Even Waldo (Yes, he's there) is easier to find than the Alamo.  An early 1900s postcard of a parade float, "Save the Alamo," and "Letter from the Alamo" from a plaque on the grounds are surrounded by some of the plaza's clutter, including a dinosaur, Stumpy, snow cones, the Odditorium, the t-shirt bearing the unheeded message "Don't Mess with Texas, San Antonio" and even the Daughters of the Republic of Texas' own unsightly addition of a pop-up tent pushing their "Live the Drama"' guides.  Hey, Phil Collins, please help.

Postcards from San Antonio ~ No. 22, "They've Breached the Walls."

Edition limited to 25 prints, $75 each. Image size: 9.5 x 7.75 inches

Mary Bonner's tasteful woodblock print originally made to help raise funds for the San Antonio Conservation Society is paired with an inscription from the Cenotaph, "In Memory of the Heroes...at the Alamo, March 6, 1836."  The images are  ruined by surrounding offers to shop at "Liber-T," view repulsive world records, obtain henna tattoos or consume ice cream cones and hoagies. Sorry to have left out the coonskin cap.

Please bear in mind the website intensifies colors; the actual print colors are much more subtle.

1900s san antonio souvenir folder
alamo on san antonio blue book
chili queens at the alamo
alamo plaza chili stands
centennial six flags plate
st. anthony in san antonio
commercialization of alamo plaza
mary bonner alamo print